2 potential knock-on effects as Sunderland plot move for Exeter City man

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Sunderland are weighing up the prospect of a move for Josh Key.

Reports from Sky Sports, via the Sunderland Echo, have claimed that the Black Cats have made a fourth bid for the Exeter City starlet as they look to strengthen their side ahead of the new season.

The 21-year-old was a first team regular for the League Two side last term as he made 48 appearances in all competitions.

A right-back by trade, Key is renowned for his offensive play and if Sunderland can strike a deal then it will certainly have some knock-on effects for Lee Johnson’s side.

Here are two scenarios for the club to consider.

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A change of role for Luke O’Nien

A move for Josh Key could be great news for Luke O’Nien.

The versatile star has regular been used in defence during his time at the club with the midfielder often used at right-back due to the lack of decent options at the club.

If a move for the 21-year-old Exeter City man does come off then O’Nien could be freed to play in his preferred midfield position, something that be a real boost to both the player himself and Lee Johnson.

Competition for Ollie Younger

Sunderland are clearly looking to sign talented young players and Josh Key fits the bill.

However if the 21-year-old does come in then it could prove troublesome for another of the club’s most talented young players, Ollie Younger.

Younger prefers to play as a centre-back but has been utilised on the right-side of defence, meaning that Key’s arrival could have a big impact on his future with Johnson perhaps being tempted to use him in his natural role more often.

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