Ex-Italy Boss Marcello Lippi On Inter’s South American Travel Chaos: “European Clubs Will No Longer Sign South American Players” | OneFootball

Ex-Italy Boss Marcello Lippi On Inter’s South American Travel Chaos: “European Clubs Will No Longer Sign South American Players”

Logo: SempreInter.Com

SempreInter.Com

Italy’s World Cup winning coach Marcello Lippi has suggested that European clubs will be deterred from signing South American players in the future because of their international federations, according to a report in the Italian print media.

Speaking during an interview with Corriere dello Sport today, Marcello Lippi explained that the federations have been too stubborn in forcing their World Cup qualifying format and it is taking its toll on the players.

“Incompetent confederations are at fault, which did not want to change the formula of their qualifying for the World Cup. In South America there are many teams, everyone has to agree, they play three games and go on until Thursday night/dawn on Friday.”

Marcello Lippi clearly feels that Inter and Juventus are the two most heavily burdened clubs in Serie A when it comes to this issue, listing the players that each side could be without for their next match.

“Two teams trust the South Americans the most. Inter with Lautaro, Vecino, Correa, Vidal, Sanchez and Juventus with Bentancur, Cuadrado, Danilo, Alex Sandro. The issue of injuries is different.

“There have always been injuries and mid-week they also arrive. If you play in the cup with your club there will be injuries.

“The real point is that relevant players swoop into the league but burdened by three more games in ten days and who have slept too little.”

As for what will happen in the long run, Marcello Lippi believes that European teams may not want to sign South American players anymore if they know they will struggle for fitness thanks to the calendar that they are forced to face.

“The European clubs will no longer hire South American players. This will put the system of those countries in crisis, which thrives on the sale of talents.”

Mentioned in this article
View publisher imprint